Food

One of the questions that is asked over and over on low carb websites and forums of all persuasions is “what sweeteners can I use”?

Well, I was going to write this blog post all by myself, but I have come across three incredibly useful resources recently, so I will bow to them.

Top 10 Natural Low-carb Sweeteners

First comes a handy list of low-carb sweeteners from the Keto Diet App (I have just bought this and will review it soon).

The list isn’t nearly as comprehensive as the Sugar and Sweetener Guide, below, but covers most of the sweeteners that we get asked about:

  1. Stevia
  2. Erythritol
  3. Xylitol
  4. Mannitol
  5. Chicory root inulin
  6. Raw honey
  7. Coconut palm sugar
  8. Maple syrup
  9. Date syrup
  10. Blackstrap molasses

There are some there that anyone into low-carb would bristle at, never mind if you’re on a ketogenic diet.  However, their “get out of jail free card” as far as I am concerned is this, from that blog post:

Sugar is sugar – no matter how healthy it is, it will impair your weight loss.

Hear, hear!  And probably kick you out of ketosis, and wreck your blood glucose numbers if you’re a diabetic.  The article describes each one, with pros and cons, and lists them in terms of sweetness, net carbs, glycemic index and do on.

Shame it doesn’t mention Luo Han Guo, which should be in there as sweetness index 300, 0 carbs, 0 GI, and a pro of not having the bitter aftertaste that some find stevia has.

Sugar and Sweetener GuideThe Sugar and Sweetener Guide

Next is an amazing website: The Sugar and Sweetener Guide.  It is a positive encyclopedia of all things sweet, both natural and artificial.

Probably the place to start is the “Comprehensive All Sweetener List” and then look at the “Sweetener Values including Calories and Glycemic Index“.  It list sweeteners by “Sweetness Index”.  Given that sucrose has a sweetness index of 1 (and fructose of 1.7, which explains why sucrose tastes less sweet than ordinary table sugar, which is a mixture of sucrose and fructose, and powdered glucose, sweetness index 0.75, tastes even less sweet), I was amazed to discover that there is a natural sweetener, Thaumatin, with a sweetness index of 2000, and an artificial sweetener, Neotame, with a sweetness index of 8000!  The mind boggles.

The Sweetener Book

Lastly there is The Sweetener Book by D. Eric Walters, Ph.D.  If the other two resources haven’t answered all your questions, then this might do it!  You can buy a paperback: [simpleazon-link asin="0989109208" locale="us"]The Sweetener Book (US Edition)[/simpleazon-link], or [simpleazon-link asin="0989109208" locale="uk"]The Sweetener Book (UK Edition)[/simpleazon-link] or the US Kindle Edition, or the UK Kindle Edition.

Again, it covers an encyclopaedic amount of information about sweeteners that everyone is discussing, and many you’ll only have heard of if you’re a food scientist.

You can review the contents of the book on the website: http://www.sweetenerbook.com/

Food Babe Investigates Stevia: Good or Bad?

At the head of this post I said I had three important links.  SInce then, I have discovered this article by the Food Babe in which she looks critically at the way some (most?) commercial brands of stevia re made.  In particular, some of the (“Stevia in the Raw”, for instance) has more erythritol than stevia, and the erythritol is made from GMO corn).

I don’t agree with 100% of what she says.  At the bottom of the post she says

And when all else fails, choose a suitable alternative and forget stevia altogether. Lisa uses honey and pure maple syrup, and I personally prefer coconut palm sugar, since it is low glycemic (making it more diabetic friendly)

Well, if you’ve followed some of the links above, especially the “Sweetener Values including Calories and Glycemic Index“, you will have formed your own opinion about honey, maple syrup and coconut palm sugar.  All depends whether you are T2 diabetic and/or if you’re trying to stay in ketosis.

There is always much talk of which butter is best and which is grass-fed.

Since I was a little lad by favourite butter has always been Danish Lurpack, unsalted.  It’s almost sinful how delicious its creamy taste is!

So I figured I better find out if it’s grass-fed, and e-mailed them.  Today I got this reply:

Good Morning ,
Thank you for contacting Lurpak .
Lurpak is produced in Denmark.
I can assure you that all our cows are grass
fed in summer, however when the weather
conditions are not suitable, they are kept
in shed where they are allowed to roam
freely and fed supplements.
Lurpak also produces the organic range,
where the milk used comes from cows that
are only grass fed.

Hope this answers your question .
Warm Regards
Tasneem Fadal

I know this post looks like an advert, but I have no commercial link with Lurpack.

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